Young People And Fake ID: The Risks And Consequences

Spread the love

Children grow up so quickly, and many young people want to be considered adults before the law sees them that way. This tempts some to get a false ID document. Using false identification does come with potentially serious consequences, both personally and legally.

Image Credit

Fake IDs

There are lots of documents that are classified as Fake ID, and not just those that are completely falsified and made from scratch. Some teens wouldn’t consider using a friend’s genuine ID and passing off as their own as being as serious as doctoring a document of their own. Forgery and counterfeiting are serious, yet many wouldn’t consider that they are committing fraud by showing someone else’s ID, and it’s that sort of education that is important.

Personal Risks

Pubs or nightclubs are restricted to over-18s because there will be adults there potentially behaving irresponsibly or offensively, and for their own safety, under-18s are shielded. There is also a risk of unwanted attention, drug abuse or weapons and violence. There is also increased risks of underage individuals taking part in sexual activity which could leave them exposed to a a number of STI’s as well as pregnancy. A STI testing London company such as https://www.checkurself.org.uk/plus/home_sti_kits/ allow for an individual to be tested for a number of STI’s in the comfort and privacy of their own homes.


Legal Implications

If you are caught using a fake ID, the police might be involved, and you could be invited to an educational workshop or directed to find out more information. It might lead to offences including Theft, or Handling Stolen Goods, among others, which could result in fines or even arrest, and having a criminal record certainly impacts future plans. Your employment opportunities might be limited as a result, and even your holiday plans might be impacted as many countries won’t grant a visa to those with a record.

Image Credit

For tips on how to spot fake ID, whether it’s your own son or daughter or you are in a safeguarding position, check the government’s advice. There is training available for those working in retail positions and campaigns such as Think 21 for selling alcohol and other restricted substances.

The law is written to protect everyone, and it is important that we abide by it and encourage others to do the same. Parents have a responsibility, but there is also a lot that schools and colleges can do. All staff with regular contact with young and vulnerable people will need a DBS check to ensure that they are safe to work with the young and vulnerable adults.

Be vigilant if you work with young people, and don’t be afraid to challenge suspicious behaviour.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.